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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again

Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again

By | August 17, 2017

Optogenetic stimulation of the perirhinal cortex can cause macaques to process never-before seen-objects as familiar and known objects as brand new.

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image: Image of the Day: Vessels For Days

Image of the Day: Vessels For Days

By | August 1, 2017

A novel contrast agent made up of tiny iron oxide nanoparticles can label blood vessels, and highlight adverse events such cerebral ischemia, in dogs and monkeys. 

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

By | June 1, 2017

Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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