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image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Brain Prize Winners Announced

Brain Prize Winners Announced

By | March 3, 2016

Three UK neuroscientists jointly win the €1 million European Brain Prize for their work on memory.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Neurons from Glia In Vivo

Neurons from Glia In Vivo

By | October 19, 2015

Scientists present new recipes for directly converting glial cells to neurons in mouse brains.

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image: Into the Limelight

Into the Limelight

By | October 1, 2015

Glial cells were once considered neurons’ supporting actors, but new methods and model organisms are revealing their true importance in brain function.

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image: Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

By | May 19, 2015

They aren't neurons, but in rats, glial cells in the brain called astrocytes (red) play a major role in repetitive motions like chewing and breathing.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: Neurons On Demand

Neurons On Demand

By | January 1, 2014

Astrocytes in the adult mouse brain can be reprogrammed into neuronal precursors, then neurons, in vivo.

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image: Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

Mice Learn Faster with Human Glia

By | March 7, 2013

Mice with human brain cells showed enhanced synaptic plasticity and learning, suggesting glia may be key to our cognitive prowess.  

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