The Scientist

» insects, culture and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

0 Comments

image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

1 Comment

image: Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

By | June 29, 2017

Two large studies find that, in real-world conditions, the insecticides are detrimental to honey bees and bumblebees.

1 Comment

image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

1 Comment

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

0 Comments

image: Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

By | June 2, 2017

Prey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

0 Comments

The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. First In Vivo Function Found for Animal Circular RNA
  2. A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain
    The Scientist A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain

    In mice, injected fragments of a naturally occurring protein boost memory in young and old animals and improve cognition and mobility in a model of neurodegenerative disease. 

  3. Nature Index Identifies Top Contributors to Innovation
  4. Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors
    Features Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

    And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

AAAS