Advertisement

The Scientist

» insects

Most Recent

image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

1 Comment

image: Genetic Data Clarify Insect Evolution

Genetic Data Clarify Insect Evolution

By | November 6, 2014

Researchers create a phylogenetic tree of insects by comparing the sequences of 1,478 protein-coding genes among species.

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | October 13, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

0 Comments

image: Sleep Tight

Sleep Tight

By | October 1, 2014

Bed bugs are but one example of a species whose populations have evolved in response to human behavior.

0 Comments

image: Are <em>Leishmania</em> Protecting their Sand Fly Hosts?

Are Leishmania Protecting their Sand Fly Hosts?

By | July 23, 2014

The microbial contents of sand fly stomachs may have important consequences for the spread of leishmaniasis.

0 Comments

image: A Rock and a Hard Place

A Rock and a Hard Place

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the retired chemical engineer who has made quite the impression on paleoentomology by uncovering ancient secrets of insect coitus.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Nature’s Nether Regions</em>

Book Excerpt from Nature’s Nether Regions

By | July 1, 2014

In Chapter 6, “Bateman Returns,” author Menno Schilthuizen surveys the battlefield of the evolutionary arms race that has led to, among other things, such excesses as “traumatic sex.”

0 Comments

image: Doodoo Rendezvous

Doodoo Rendezvous

By | July 1, 2014

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

0 Comments

image: The Love Bug

The Love Bug

By | July 1, 2014

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

1 Comment

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Rainin Instrument
Rainin Instrument
Advertisement
Life Technologies