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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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image: Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

By | June 29, 2017

Two large studies find that, in real-world conditions, the insecticides are detrimental to honey bees and bumblebees.

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image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

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image: Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

By | June 2, 2017

Prey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.

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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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image: Image of the Day: Smells like Royalty

Image of the Day: Smells like Royalty

By | May 8, 2017

Indian jumping ants, Harpegnathos saltator, can identify future queens based on a pheromone produced by the royal larvae.

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image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

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image: Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

By | March 10, 2017

The robber fly (Holcocephala fusca) has a highly sensitive visual system, which can detect prey up to 100 body lengths away.

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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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