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image: Week in Review: July 14–18

Week in Review: July 14–18

By | July 18, 2014

Converting heart muscle to pacemaker cells in pigs; alternative splicing and the human proteome; questioning a reported yogurt mold-illness link; H. pylori swiftly find mouse stomach injuries

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 17, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Sizable Winged Dinosaur Found

Sizable Winged Dinosaur Found

By | July 17, 2014

Analysis of an approximately 125 million-year-old fossil found in China creates a new upper limit for microraptor size.

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image: “Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

“Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

By | July 15, 2014

Linking a mold identified in a sample of recalled yogurt to consumer-reported illnesses may be premature, scientists say.

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image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

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