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image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

1 Comment

image: Weight's the Matter?

Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

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image: The Lasting Effects of Obesity

The Lasting Effects of Obesity

By | April 23, 2015

Losing weight does not mitigate the effects of obesity on tumor development in mice.

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image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  

7 Comments

image: Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

By | October 14, 2013

A genetic mutation tied to risk of developing testicular cancer may be more prevalent in white men because it also confers a reduced risk of developing skin cancer.

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image: Helpful Bacterial Metabolites

Helpful Bacterial Metabolites

By | August 1, 2011

While gut microbiota appear to have both positive and negative impacts on our  health, in the guts of healthy, lean individuals, the good outweighs the bad.  

3 Comments

image: Sharing the Bounty

Sharing the Bounty

By | August 1, 2011

Gut bacteria may be the missing piece that explains the connection between diet and cancer risk.

24 Comments

image: Cancer is Greater Threat to the Tall

Cancer is Greater Threat to the Tall

By | July 21, 2011

Research suggests that tall women have a greater risk of developing a wide range of cancers.

3 Comments

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