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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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Animal experiments published in a handful of cardiovascular journals mostly ignore NIH guidelines.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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image: PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

By | March 22, 2017

A cholesterol-lowering drug significantly cut the risk of heart attack and stroke in a recent study. But is it worth the steep cost?

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