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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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image: Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

By | March 1, 2017

Fecal transplants from humans with irritable bowel syndrome and anxiety into mice lead to similar symptoms and anxiety-like behavior in the rodents, researchers report.  

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image: Image of the Day: Brainy Bees

Image of the Day: Brainy Bees

By | February 24, 2017

Bees can learn complex behaviors to obtain rewards.

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Image of the Day: Busy Bees

Image of the Day: Busy Bees

By | February 21, 2017

Worker bumblebees vary in how efficiently they bring pollen and nectar back to the hive—the most active foragers can make up to 40 times more trips than the least active ones.

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