The Scientist

» bees

Most Recent

image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

0 Comments

image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

1 Comment

image: Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

By | September 1, 2016

The second visual field may aid in navigation.

0 Comments

image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

1 Comment

image: Pesticides Reduce Male Honeybee Fertility: Study

Pesticides Reduce Male Honeybee Fertility: Study

By | July 27, 2016

Drones exposed to neonicotinoids have fewer viable sperm and show reduced longevity.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

0 Comments

image: Parasite-Pathogen Partnership

Parasite-Pathogen Partnership

By | March 7, 2016

Parasitic mites that transmit a honey bee-infecting virus may benefit from spreading the pathogen, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

By | January 22, 2016

Honeybee seminal fluid contains two different components that fight Nosema fungus.

3 Comments

image: US Wild Bee Populations Waning

US Wild Bee Populations Waning

By | December 23, 2015

Study shows declines in bee abundance where pollination services are increasingly in demand.

1 Comment

image: Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

By | August 28, 2015

The consumption of p-coumaric acid, a chemical found in honey and pollen, may help set a female honeybee on its course to becoming a worker instead of a queen.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice
  2. Superbug Resistant to Every Antibiotic in the U.S. Killed Nevada Woman
  3. Next Generation: Mobile Microscope Detects DNA Sequences
  4. Tenure Under Attack in Two More States
    The Nutshell Tenure Under Attack in Two More States

    Proposed legislation would eliminate academic tenure at public universities in Iowa and Missouri, echoing a move that has already gutted such permanent posts in Wisconsin.

RayBiotech