The Scientist

» mutation

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Super Spores 

Image of the Day: Super Spores 

By | September 28, 2017

The deadly fungus Cryptococcus deuterogattii harbors a genetic tweak that propels its mutation rate and allows it to rapidly develop antifungal resistance.

0 Comments

image: Reverse Transcriptase with Proofreading Capabilities Created

Reverse Transcriptase with Proofreading Capabilities Created

By | June 27, 2016

Using directed evolution, researchers selected a DNA polymerase to copy RNA into DNA.

0 Comments

image: Another Genetic Cause of Venous Malformations Found

Another Genetic Cause of Venous Malformations Found

By | March 31, 2016

Mutations in a cancer gene could account for some cases of disfiguring blood vessel abnormalities, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

0 Comments

image: HIV Quickly Invades the Brain

HIV Quickly Invades the Brain

By | March 30, 2015

The virus that causes AIDS can replicate and mutate in the brain as early as four months after initial infection, according to a new study.

0 Comments

image: Mosaic Mutations

Mosaic Mutations

By | July 31, 2014

Some genetic abnormalities that appear to have sprung up independently in children are in fact present in a portion of their parents’ cells.

3 Comments

image: Targeted Brain Cancer Vaccine

Targeted Brain Cancer Vaccine

By | June 25, 2014

Mouse study demonstrates the ability of a cancer vaccine targeted against a specific oncogenic mutation to elicit a protective anti-tumor immune response. 

1 Comment

image: Mutation Tied to Reduced Heart Disease

Mutation Tied to Reduced Heart Disease

By | June 20, 2014

Genetic variants that cripple a triglyceride-producing protein are linked with a lower risk of heart attack and stroke.

1 Comment

image: Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

By | October 14, 2013

A genetic mutation tied to risk of developing testicular cancer may be more prevalent in white men because it also confers a reduced risk of developing skin cancer.

0 Comments

image: Sexually Confused Dog

Sexually Confused Dog

By | September 23, 2011

A female bulldog with testicles but no SRY gene considered scientific anomaly.

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia
  2. German Scientists Resign from Elsevier Journals’ Editorial Boards
  3. Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects
  4. Swapping Cigarettes for Vaping
    The Scientist Swapping Cigarettes for Vaping

    New evidence suggests e-cigarettes are not without risks to human health, but can be useful in getting people to kick their smoking habit.

RayBiotech