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image: Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants

Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants

By | September 22, 2016

Among this year’s 23 MacArthur Foundation Fellows are pioneering biologists.

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image: Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

By | September 12, 2016

Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.

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image: Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

By | September 8, 2016

As E. coli bacteria spread over increasingly concentrated antibiotics, researchers discover novel evolutionary pathways that confer resistance.

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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2016 issue of The Scientist

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Hunting with Sharks

Hunting with Sharks

By | September 1, 2016

Watch scenes from research at the University of South Florida's Mote Marine Laboratory, where scientists saw what happened when they knocked out sharks' electroreception.

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