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image: Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

Vampire Bats Lack Bitter Taste

By | June 25, 2014

With a diet of blood, the flying mammals have largely lost the ability to taste bitter flavors.

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image: Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

By | March 18, 2014

Emerging evidence suggests that the marine mammal’s long front tooth might help the narwhal sense environmental changes.  

1 Comment

image: Seeing with Sound

Seeing with Sound

By | March 10, 2014

Converting sights to sounds reveals that the brains of congenitally blind people respond similarly to various objects as those of subjects who can see.

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image: Feeding Frenzy

Feeding Frenzy

By | March 1, 2014

Take a peek into the shark tank where Boston University biologist Jelle Atema is testing how well the fish actually smell.

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image: Jaws, Reconsidered

Jaws, Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2014

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.

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image: Feeling Is Believing

Feeling Is Believing

By | February 1, 2014

Many people can “see” their hands in complete darkness, absent any visual stimulus, due to kinesthetic feedback from their own movements.

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image: Seeing in the Dark

Seeing in the Dark

By | February 1, 2014

Meet the scientists and study subjects behind research into how senses work together to form perceptions of the world.

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image: Shrimp Sight

Shrimp Sight

By | January 24, 2014

Although mantis shrimp eyes have twelve different photoreceptors, the crustaceans have a hard time distinguishing colors, according to a new study.

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image: Dissociating Sound and Touch

Dissociating Sound and Touch

By | November 12, 2013

Trained musicians appear to have superior multisensory processing skills, according to research presented at the Society for Neuroscience conference.

1 Comment

image: A Pheromone by Any Other Name

A Pheromone by Any Other Name

By | October 1, 2013

Long known to play a role in sexual attraction, pheromones are revealing their influence over a range of nonsexual behaviors as researchers tease apart the neural circuitry that translates smells into action.

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