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Researchers overestimate the reliability of findings from animal studies that are part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology.

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Animal experiments published in a handful of cardiovascular journals mostly ignore NIH guidelines.

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Scientists shut down cancer-causing fusion genes with CRISPR.

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

By | March 26, 2017

The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

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image: RNA Vaccine for Zika Shows Promise

RNA Vaccine for Zika Shows Promise

By | February 2, 2017

Researchers use modified messenger RNA to produce a vaccine that protected mice and nonhuman primates from infection.

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image: The Trouble With Sex in Science

The Trouble With Sex in Science

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers argue for the consideration of hormones and sex chromosomes in preclinical experiments.

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image: TS Picks: February 11, 2016

TS Picks: February 11, 2016

By | February 11, 2016

Reproducibility edition

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image: In Situ Antibodies

In Situ Antibodies

By | February 2, 2016

Compared with systemic injections, localized antibody therapies may be more effective for some indications.

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image: The Sounds of Silence

The Sounds of Silence

By | September 1, 2015

Science-based tinnitus therapeutics are finally coming into their own.

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