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image: Cooking Up Cancer?

Cooking Up Cancer?

By | April 1, 2017

Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

3 Comments

image: Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

By | November 17, 2016

Researchers enhance the photosynthetic yield of tobacco plants with genetic engineering.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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FDA Head Leaving Post

By | February 6, 2015

US Food and Drug Administration commissioner Margaret Hamburg is stepping down after six years on the job.

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From the Feature Well

By | December 30, 2014

A review of The Scientist’s 2014 special issues, highlighting trending areas of research across the life sciences

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Rusty Waves of Grain

By | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

1 Comment

image: Designer Livestock

Designer Livestock

By | June 1, 2014

New technologies will make it easier to manipulate animal genomes, but food products from genetically engineered animals face a long road to market.

3 Comments

image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

7 Comments

image: Crop Coalescence

Crop Coalescence

By | March 5, 2014

While national food supplies have diversified during the last 50 years, the global crop selection has homogenized, new analysis shows.

0 Comments

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