The Scientist

» peer review, culture and ecology

Most Recent

image: Study: Peer Reviewers Swayed by Prestige

Study: Peer Reviewers Swayed by Prestige

By | September 27, 2016

Evaluators of mock submissions to an orthopedic surgery journal were more likely to recommend a manuscript for publication when it came from distinguished authors compared with anonymous ones.

0 Comments

image: TS Picks: September 26, 2016

TS Picks: September 26, 2016

By | September 27, 2016

World leaders agree to fight superbugs; researchers edit human embryos; peer reviewers’ motivations

1 Comment

image: Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

By | September 26, 2016

The “Sentinels of Science” award recognizes especially productive peer reviewers.

1 Comment

image: Ocean Viruses Cataloged

Ocean Viruses Cataloged

By | September 21, 2016

An international research team triples the number of known virus types found in marine environments. 

0 Comments

Policymakers’ choice of seawater intakes highlights California’s troubling embrace of unproven technologies.

0 Comments

image: Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

By | September 20, 2016

An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

2 Comments

image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

1 Comment

image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

1 Comment

image: A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

By | September 1, 2016

An indigenous community in northeastern India is a crucial part of the effort to save these majestic forest birds from extinction.

1 Comment

In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech