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image: Book Excerpt from <em>An Essay on Science and Narcissism</em>

Book Excerpt from An Essay on Science and Narcissism

By | October 1, 2016

In Chapter 3, "Determining Narcissism in Science with Real-Life Examples," author Bruno Lemaitre considers Niels Jerne.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2016 issue of The Scientist

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image: Saving Jon

Saving Jon

By | October 1, 2016

Meet the researcher/entrepreneur who started a nonprofit that seeks to solve the science behind a rare disease that threatens the life of her younger brother.

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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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