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image: Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

By | July 11, 2016

Excavating existing topsoil and adding donor soil, researchers revitalized degraded farmland in the span of six years.


image: Putting Phytoremediation into Action

Putting Phytoremediation into Action

By and | August 1, 2015

Researchers studying the use of bacteria and plants to remove toxins from the soil must better communicate their results if they want their techniques to be used by practitioners in the field.


image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.


image: Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

By | December 10, 2012

Long-term exposure to antibiotics from agricultural run off may encourage the evolution of soil bacteria that break down and consume the antibacterial agents.

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image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."


image: Soil Harbors Antibiotic Resistance

Soil Harbors Antibiotic Resistance

By | August 30, 2012

Identical resistance genes in soil and clinical bacteria hint at dangerous genetic arms trade that is aggravating the antibiotic-resistance crisis.


image: The Ecology of Fear

The Ecology of Fear

By | June 15, 2012

Grasshoppers in fear of predation die with less nitrogen in their bodies than unstressed grasshoppers, which can affect soil ecology.


image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | August 1, 2011

As the planet warms plant growth will likely increase—locking up some of that extra carbon dioxide by converting it into vegetative biomass—but that’s not the whole story. 


image: The Root of the Problem

The Root of the Problem

By | August 1, 2011

New research suggests that the flow of carbon through plants to underground ecosystems may be crucial to how the environment responds to climate change.


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