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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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S. Allen Counter pursued scientific questions within various cultures throughout the world.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Bioethicist and Law Professor Dies

Bioethicist and Law Professor Dies

By | July 6, 2017

John Robertson was known for his contributions to reproductive medicine ethics and for solidifying the scholarly connection between biomedicine and law.

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image: Crystallography Innovator Dies

Crystallography Innovator Dies

By | June 26, 2017

Philip Coppens, who developed photocrystallography, has passed away at age 86.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

By | June 13, 2017

A child neurologist, Isabelle Rapin popularized the notion that autism was part of a spectrum of disorders.

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