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image: Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

By | February 28, 2017

Human embryonic kidney cells use actin cytoskeletal networks to organize proteins on the surfaces of cell membranes.

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image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.

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image: New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

By | November 25, 2014

Researchers have nailed down yet another component of the mechanotransduction complex responsible for relaying signals from hair cells in the ear.

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image: Light-Operated Drugs

Light-Operated Drugs

By | November 1, 2014

Scientists create a photosensitive pharmaceutical to target a glutamate receptor.

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image: Key Osmotic Channel Protein Identified

Key Osmotic Channel Protein Identified

By | April 10, 2014

A little-studied protein appears to be a critical part of the perplexing channel that prevents cells from bursting.

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image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

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image: Centipede Venom Tops Morphine

Centipede Venom Tops Morphine

By | October 1, 2013

The substance targets the same ion channel that's mutated in people who don't feel pain.

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image: The Sound of Salt

The Sound of Salt

By | January 30, 2013

A putative ion channel integral to mammalian hearing turns out to be an elusive salt-sensing chemoreceptor in nematode worms.

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image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

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