The Scientist

» symbiosis and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Light Scattering Varies Among Corals

Light Scattering Varies Among Corals

By | July 13, 2017

A new study reports which types of corals make the most of the sunlight they receive. 

0 Comments

image: How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

How Bacteria in Flies Kill Parasitic Wasps

By | July 10, 2017

Ribosome-inactivating proteins from symbiotic bacteria leave their hosts unharmed.

0 Comments

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

By | May 18, 2017

Stylophora pistillata, a reef coral in the Northern Red Sea, thrived in simulated global-warming conditions.

2 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS