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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Q&A: From FDA to Industry

Q&A: From FDA to Industry

By | September 27, 2016

Among a subset of US Food and Drug Administration regulators who leave the agency, more than half go to work for pharmaceutical companies, researchers report.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

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image: Feds Demand More Clinical Trial Reporting

Feds Demand More Clinical Trial Reporting

By | September 19, 2016

Expanded US Health and Human Services rules will require the results of more human studies to be made public.

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image: Conditional FDA Approval for Fatal-Disease Drug

Conditional FDA Approval for Fatal-Disease Drug

By | September 19, 2016

The agency OKs Sarepta Therapeutics’s treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy through its accelerated approval pathway, which requires a confirmatory clinical trial.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

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Manufacturers have not demonstrated the safety or efficacy of 19 antibacterial agents common in hand and body soaps, according to the US Food and Drug Administration.

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