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image: On Race, Gender, and NIH Funding

On Race, Gender, and NIH Funding

By | August 1, 2016

The results of two studies suggest slightly different biases in the review of National Institutes of Health R01 grant applications from minority and/or women researchers.

0 Comments

image: Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

By | April 7, 2014

Reduction in telomere length is associated with stress early on in life and may have a genetic component, researchers find.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: A Diverse Perspective

Opinion: A Diverse Perspective

By | July 29, 2013

Progress in science is dependent on the diversity of its workforce.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: On Being an “African-American Scientist”

Opinion: On Being an “African-American Scientist”

By | March 5, 2013

If African-American researchers are ever to gain equal opportunities in science, even subtle cases of differential treatment must be stamped out.

15 Comments

image: NIH Tackles Racism

NIH Tackles Racism

By | June 25, 2012

An advisory committee urges the federal funding agency to take steps to counter racial bias in the granting process.

2 Comments

image: NIH Biased Against Blacks?

NIH Biased Against Blacks?

By | August 22, 2011

A new study reveals that African American researchers are 10 percent less likely to receive funding from the federal agency than their white peers.

39 Comments

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