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image: Opinion: How Congress Is Failing on Zika

Opinion: How Congress Is Failing on Zika

By | September 19, 2016

Congressional inaction when it comes to extending funding for a major outbreak may endanger the health of thousands of Americans.

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image: Body Fluids Might Explain Unsolved Zika Case

Body Fluids Might Explain Unsolved Zika Case

By | September 14, 2016

A government investigation into the cause of a Utah man’s infection comes up short of conclusive results.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: FDA: Screen All US Blood Donations for Zika

FDA: Screen All US Blood Donations for Zika

By | August 29, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration recommends that all blood collected across the country be tested for the virus.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | August 24, 2016

More locally acquired cases in Florida; fetal brain damage investigated

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | August 17, 2016

More local transmission within the U.S.; babies born with costly birth defects; virus persists in a patient’s semen for six months

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