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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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image: Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

By | May 1, 2016

Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

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image: Shark Skin-Like Surface Fights MRSA

Shark Skin-Like Surface Fights MRSA

By | September 17, 2014

Surfaces covered in a micropattern mimicking the ridges of shark skin could reduce the spread of drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other superbugs in hospitals.

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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

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image: Reading Tea Leaves

Reading Tea Leaves

By | February 1, 2012

Cyclic peptides, discovered in an African tea used to speed labor and delivery, may hold potential as drug-stabilizing scaffolds, antibiotics, and anticancer drugs.

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image: The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics

The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics

By | August 31, 2011

Researchers find antibiotic resistance genes in 30,000-year-old bacteria, suggesting such resistance is not a modern phenomenon.

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image: Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

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