The Scientist

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2016

Top 10 Innovations 2016

By | December 1, 2016

This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

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image: Mass Spec Analysis of Protein Interactions

Mass Spec Analysis of Protein Interactions

By | October 1, 2016

Using the technique to study how RNA, DNA, lipids, and small molecules interact with proteins

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image: Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

By | December 1, 2015

A nanoscopic needle and a mass spectrometer reveal the contents of individual cells.

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image: Cracking the Complex

Cracking the Complex

By | November 1, 2015

Using mass spec to study protein-protein interactions

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image: GC-MS Distorts Data?

GC-MS Distorts Data?

By | October 22, 2015

A study suggests that gas chromatography-mass spectrometry modifies or destroys sample compounds, but some are skeptical.

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image: Anatomy of a Virus

Anatomy of a Virus

By | September 16, 2014

A mass spectrometry-based analysis of influenza virions provides a detailed view of their composition.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Tailoring Your Proteome View

Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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image: Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

By | July 1, 2014

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

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image: Moving Target

Moving Target

By | June 1, 2014

New mass spectrometry–based techniques are blurring the lines between discovery and targeted proteomics.

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