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image: First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

By | March 1, 2016

Less than six months after a woman in Sweden gave birth to a healthy baby from a transplanted womb, doctors in Cleveland begin a clinical trial to test the procedure in 10 US women.

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image: Squirmy Sperm

Squirmy Sperm

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists observe another form of locomotion for male gametes, akin to a snake’s slither.

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image: Common Chemicals Damage Sperm

Common Chemicals Damage Sperm

By | May 13, 2014

Researchers elucidate a molecular mechanism through which endocrine disrupting compounds compromise the viability of human gametes.

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 8, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

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image: Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

Why Women’s Eggs Don’t Last

By | February 13, 2013

As reproductive tissues age, DNA repair mechanisms become less efficient, causing genomic damage to accumulate.

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image: Ovulation Induced by a Nerve Growth Factor

Ovulation Induced by a Nerve Growth Factor

By | August 20, 2012

Researchers identify a nerve growth factor in semen that stimulates ovulation in certain mammals, and which could shed light on human infertility.

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