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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Newton's Color Theory, ca. 1665

Newton's Color Theory, ca. 1665

By | March 1, 2017

Newton’s rainbow forms the familiar ROYGBIV because he thought the range of visible colors should be analogous to the seven-note musical scale.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

2 Comments

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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