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Did SARS come from bats?

By | October 24, 2005

Wild bats, rather than civet cats, may have been the source of the coronavirus behind the deadly SARS outbreak in 2003.

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Sexual communication in tears

By | October 24, 2005

For mice, getting teary-eyed conveys more than just sentiment.

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Brain genes changing

By | October 10, 2005

The human brain is still evolving.

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Interdisciplinary Research

October 10, 2005

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.A.J. Dupuy et al., "Mammalian mutagenesis using a highly mobile somatic Sleeping Beauty transposon system," Nature, 436:221–6, July 14, 2005.This paper describes a modification of the Sleeping Beauty fish transposon which allows it to be used for efficient mutagenesis screens in mice. The authors provide proof-of-principle for the usefulness of t

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Nanotubes link immune cells

By | October 10, 2005

Nature has once again beaten nanotechnology to the punch.

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Embryonic stem lines unstable

By | September 26, 2005

Human embryonic stem cells appear to accrue genomic changes that could make them unusable therapeutically when cultured at length.

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HCV replicates with help from microRNA

By | September 26, 2005

California researchers have found a previously unrecognized role for microRNAs: aiding and abeting hepatitis C virus in the liver.

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Is telomerase moonlighting?

By | September 26, 2005

The debate continues as to whether telomerase's only function is to promote telomere extension.

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Insects may have complex immunity

By | September 12, 2005

Insect immunity may display hitherto unsuspected molecular complexity.

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Interdisciplinary Research

September 12, 2005

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.J. Lu et al., "MicroRNA expression profiles classify human cancers," Nature, 435:834–8, June 9, 2005.This article makes the surprising discovery that microRNA-expression profiles can be better predictors of cancer outcome than mRNA profiles. This conclusion is based on the use of a novel, bead-based flow-cytometry approach to examine the expressi

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