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Models for HCV

By | September 12, 2005

Without a sufficient cell culture system, researchers have had little success designing and testing drugs for the treatment of the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

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Cloning at the hill

By | August 1, 2005

) colonies reveal an unexpected mode of reproduction.

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Gemini genetics

By | August 1, 2005

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have shown that 35% of twin pairs have significant differences in DNA-methylation and histone-modification profiles.1 Moreover, the study suggests that gaps in epigenetic profiles widen with age. Arturas Petronis of the University of Toronto says, "It is good to have data that confirms what we long suspected."Manel Esteller of the Spanish National Cancer Center in Madrid and colleagues in Sweden, Denmark, Spain, England, and the United States studied

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Reverse vaccinology success story

By | August 1, 2005

Courtesy of Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIHIn a finding that further validates an emerging vaccine strategy, researchers in Italy and the United States have worked backward from genome to antigens to identify a protein cocktail that may confer global protection against group B streptococcus (GBS).1This discovery represents "one of the important ways in which the promise of genomics can be harnessed," says Victor Nizet of the University of California, San Diego, who did not participate in

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These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.H. Aldaz et al., "Insights into microtubule nucleation from the crystal structure of human β-tubulin," Nature, 435:523–7, May 26, 2005.The authors have determined the crystal structure of γ-tubulin bound to GTP-γ S (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog) at 2.7 Å resolution. γ-tubulin forms part of the γ-tubulin ring complex

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Non-stimulatory stimulation

By | July 18, 2005

Healthy immune systems are supposed to ignore self-molecules when looking for foreign invaders.

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Sun-free photosynthesis?

By | July 18, 2005

The ocean floor is a dark place for a photosynthetic bacterium.

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Genes jumping in the brain

By | July 4, 2005

Genetic elements that jump around the genome can influence brain circuitry, according to US researchers.

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Reward biochemistry linked to Clock

By | July 4, 2005

gene is involved in regulating the brain's dopaminergic reward pathway.

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Toxins harm descendants' fertility

By | July 4, 2005

US researchers have evidence that damage to mammalian male fertility caused by transient exposure of embryos to endocrine-disrupting environmental toxins can be passed down to subsequent generations.1 "The endocrine disruptors appear to have altered the remethylation and permanently reprogrammed the germ line, that is, sperm," explains study coauthor Michael Skinner of Washington State University in Pullman.Skinner and colleagues exposed female rats in mid gestation to high doses of two endocrin

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