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These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.S. Cabantous et al., "Protein tagging and detection with engineered self-assembling fragments of green fluorescent protein," Nat Biotechnol, 23:102–7, Jan. 5, 2005.A split [green fluorescent] protein-tagging and detection system was developed that can be easily used in high-throughput screens to obtain soluble, well-folded (recombinant) proteins.

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A group that represents senior scientists and others at the National Institutes of Health is proposing less restrictive regulations concerning the ownership of stock in drug and biotech companies, and the ability to consult with universities and academic institutions.

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Visa rules relaxed

By | March 28, 2005

In a move to enhance US economic competitiveness, the State Department in February extended the period for visa security clearances for non-US citizens working in "sensitive areas," such as chemistry, pharmacology, and engineering.

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Asia taking the stem cell lead

By | March 14, 2005

Researchers in China, South Korea, and Singapore are testing the lead taken by Western countries in the field of stem cell research, according to members of a UK government mission.

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Court weighs in on embryos

By | March 14, 2005

An Illinois judge cleared the way for a couple to sue a Chicago fertility clinic for wrongful death after clinic workers accidentally disposed of a healthy embryo.

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Synaptic transmission tenets challenged

By | March 14, 2005

Two distinct pools of synaptic vesicles appear to be involved in the spontaneous release of neurotransmitters and in neurotransmission triggered by a stimulus, according to Ege T. Kavalali and colleagues from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

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Timing xenotransplantation

By | March 14, 2005

© 2005 National Academy of SciencesIsraeli researchers report that embryonic pig tissues used for liver, pancreas, and lung transplants need to come from very specific windows of time in embryonic development.1 The findings offer new insights into organogenesis and might help explain past failures in xenotransplantation, says coauthor Yair Reisner of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.Reisner and his colleagues transplanted pig tissue precursors from embryonic day (E)21 to

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To be young again

By | March 14, 2005

Old cells may regain a youthful phenotype when exposed to a young cell environment, say researchers from Stanford University and VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California.

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US firm and antivivisectionists in cat fight

By | March 14, 2005

Genetic Savings and Clone, a leading pet-cloning company in Sausalito, Calif., announced the sale of its second cloned cat in February and dropped its price for the service from $50,000 to $32,000.

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Active breathing in insects

By | February 28, 2005

Rather than rely solely on passive diffusion, insects use discontinuous patterns of gas exchange to avoid the toxic effects of oxygen, according to researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

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