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Interdisciplinary research

By | February 28, 2005

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.J.F. Roeth et al., "HIV-1 Nef disrupts MHC-I trafficking by recruiting AP-1 to the MHC-I cytoplasmic tail." J Cell Biol, 167:903–13, Dec. 6, 2004.This study defines a novel pathway by which immune evasion protein Nef of HIV-1 traffics MHC-I proteins in T cells from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the lysosome for degradation. Indeed, the authors

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RNA pol does double duty

By | February 28, 2005

by an RNA polymerase that acts as a liaison between both pathways, according to UK researchers.

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Enzyme governs nerve polarity

By | February 14, 2005

), governs axon and dendrite growth in determining cell polarity, according to research groups from China and Japan.

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Natural selection in humans

By | February 14, 2005

Researchers at deCODE Genetics in Reykjavik, Iceland, have discovered a large chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome that appears to have been selected for in some European populations.1The rearrangement, a 900-kilobase inversion polymorphism at chromosome 17q21.31, appears in two lineages, H1 and H2, that have diverged for as many as 3 million years with no evidence of having recombined. The H2 lineage – rare in Africans, almost nonexistent in East Asians, but found in 20% of Europ

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sex life revealed

By | February 14, 2005

, an ancient protist long considered to be asexual, may have a sex life.

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Interdisciplinary Research

January 31, 2005

These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.S.E. Williams et al., "Hemoxygenase-2 is an oxygen sensor for a calcium-sensitive potassium channel," Science, 306:2093-7, Dec. 17, 2004.It was known that [Big K+] channels are sensitive to oxygen, but the mechanism of sensing oxygen has remained elusive. It appears now that hemoxygenase-2 is in a complex with BK channels, and that carbon monoxide, a p

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Nuclear interference

By | January 31, 2005

RNA interference (RNAi) takes place in the nuclei of human cells, according to a group from the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

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Statins reduce amyloid-induced inflammation

By | January 31, 2005

Statin drugs appear to reduce inflammation associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) in a cholesterol-independent manner, say researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland.

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ATP-free phosphorylation

By | January 17, 2005

For the first time, scientists have described a way for cells to add phosphate groups to proteins that doesn't involve an ATP donor.

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These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature-awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.R. Ando et al., "Regulated fast nucleocytoplasmic shuttling observed by reversible protein highlighting," Science, 306:1370-3, Nov. 19, 2004.The authors describe a new fluorophore (Dronpa) that has a high quantum yield as well as being remarkably photochromic. Dronpa can be interconverted between bright (fluorescent) and dark (nonfluorescent) states by

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