Advertisement

Frontlines

Most Recent

Killing Tumors, One Clove at a Time

By | February 2, 2004

Figure 1When David Mirelman went to China 15 years ago for a conference on amoebic dysentery, a Chinese physician, claiming he knew a cure, handed Mirelman a bottle of fermented garlic. Mirelman took the bottle back to the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, where he began studying the biochemical basis of garlic's curative powers.He quickly honed in on the protein allicin. When a cook crushes a garlic clove, the membranes of its cysts, which are filled with the protease alliinase, break. The

0 Comments

Mirror, Mirror in the Squid...

By | February 2, 2004

Figure 1When postdoctoral researcher Wendy Crookes and colleagues at the University of Hawaii-Manoa searched for membrane proteins that allow the immune system of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, to recognize the bioluminescent symbiotic bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, the unexpected turned up. Instead of finding membrane proteins, Crookes says they found proteins with similar characteristics that form hundreds of stacks of reflective platelets in the squid's light organ reflector.1 The

0 Comments

Mimicking Critter Movement

By | January 19, 2004

It creeps like a worm, crawls like a snail, slithers like a snake and inches along like an inchworm. But the critter Lakshmi-narayanan Mahadevan and colleagues have designed is merely a filament of cylindrical hydrogel with a 2 mm radius measuring 2 cm long.1 By vibrating the glass plate on which the artificial animal rests and subjecting it to different oscillation patterns, the researchers induced the gel to execute different gaits."Our simple system suggests that there's an underlying unity i

0 Comments

Watson, On and Off Camera

By | January 19, 2004

Science Source Researcher/Photo Researchers IncYou wouldn't think a molecule could become a piece of pop culture, but PBS is currently running another series on that J-Lo of molecules, DNA. The television version of James Watson's latest book DNA: The Secret of Life, ranges from familiar history to speculations about the future of genetic research. It began Jan. 4 and runs through Feb. 1.Watson, in Los Angeles to promote the show, says the series' narrator is actor Jeff Goldblum, who played Wats

0 Comments

A Rediscovery, a New Species

By | December 15, 2003

Frontlines | A Rediscovery, a New Species Courtesy of Luiz Claudio Marigo Much of the Brazilian Amazon remains accessible only by small boats, including the Rio Negro basin. Here, researchers conducting a long-term mammalian parasite study have rediscovered a forgotten bearded saki primate: Chiropotes israelita.1 Small, dark, and shy, Chiropotes lives high in trees. Its elusive nature and remote habitat contributed to the poor understanding of its taxonomy, says Shawn Lehman, anthropology

0 Comments

Selling Directly to the Mind

By | December 1, 2003

Frontlines | Selling Directly to the Mind Erica P. Johnson You see a sweater for sale and think, "I have to have that!" Clint Kilts wants to know why. Kilts, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University in Atlanta, is investigating the underlying neural organization that governs personal preferences and the decision-making process. Regarding a product, there's not a lot of conscious deliberation, he says. People decide quickly whether they like something. Kil

0 Comments

Trilobites: Living on the Edge

By | December 1, 2003

Frontlines | Trilobites: Living on the Edge Courtesy of The Yoho-Burgess Shale Foundation The most familiar and abundant species of trilobites in North America may have followed an exotic survival strategy. Elrathia kingii, found in Middle Cambrian formations in Utah, lived exclusively in low-oxygen environments, according to geologist Robert Gaines of Pomona College, Claremont, Calif.1 "Elrathia occurs typically in monospecific communities, with as many as 500 individuals per square

0 Comments

Shooting Darts and Counting Eggs

By | November 17, 2003

Frontlines | Shooting Darts and Counting Eggs Mark Heine Illustration Garden snails might seem dull, but the reproductive behavior of Helix aspersa is far from it: These hermaphroditic animals shoot darts at their intended after copulation. They also count their eggs before laying them. Tomasz Antkowiak and Ronald Chase at McGill University in Montreal recently discovered a large nerve in the land snail's ovotestis; the nerve monitors the number of eggs inside. Because laying eggs is a hu

0 Comments

Smallpox Vaccination Plan Is 'Kaput'--Or Is It?

By | November 17, 2003

Frontlines | Smallpox Vaccination Plan Is 'Kaput'--Or Is It? On Dec. 14, 2002, the Bush Administration announced its plan to vaccinate within a 30-day period about 400,000 to 500,000 healthcare workers and "other critical personnel" against smallpox.1 That plan fizzled amid concerns about possible serious adverse reactions and confusion about who could be vaccinated safely.2 By Oct. 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Web site indicated that only 38,542 people are v

0 Comments

Lying About Your Age is Getting Tougher

By | November 3, 2003

Frontlines | Lying About Your Age is Getting Tougher A person's voice is an age indicator, say researchers at the University of Florida, Gainesville. The team, led by Rahul Shrivastav, assistant professor of communication processes and disorders, determined that two key elements, pitch and rate of speed, can reveal age. Shrivastav analyzed 30 voices, which listeners frequently had identified as being old or young, to determine common characteristics. Using computer software to manipulate

0 Comments

Advertisement

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies