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By | October 14, 2002

Frontlines Image: Erica P. Johnson Size (in some cases) does matter For those who dismiss the stereotype of males behaving more aggressively than women as being 'all in your head,' it might be time to eat crow. Magnetic resonance imaging scans have provided neurological evidence that men are more hot-tempered than women (R.C. Gur, "Sex difference in temporo-limbic and frontal brain volumes of healthy adults," Journal of the Cerebral Cortex, 12:998, September 2002). Scans of the temporo-limb

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Frontlines

By | September 30, 2002

Frontlines Image: Anna Powers Social thinking Planning a future, knowing your limitations, following moral rules--these and other uniquely human capacities will be the focus of a research project at California Institute of Technology funded by a million dollar grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Associate Professor of philosophy Steven Quartz will lead an interdisciplinary team of social scientists and neurobiologists who will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR

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Frontlines

By | September 16, 2002

Frontlines Image: Anne MacNamara Math is life Mathematicians and biologists now have a few more reasons to pool resources and expertise. New grants cosponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) are available to scientists who apply innovative mathematical approaches to biological problems (www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/nsf02125/nsf02125.htm). The two agencies have awarded 20 grantees roughly $24 million over the next five years and wil

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Frontlines

By | September 2, 2002

Frontlines Photo: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Opportunities in Allison's wake Since Hurricane Allison struck last June, researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, have been rebuilding and improving their facilities. "We said, 'Let's not just build back what we had, let's aim to do it better,'" says George Stencel, interim vice president for research. He estimates the project's cost in the "several hundred million dollar" range (H. Black,

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Frontlines

By | August 19, 2002

Frontlines Image © 2002 Nature Publishing Group Seeing cancer in real time? Researchers at University of California's Jonsson Cancer Center in Los Angeles have developed the first viral 'searchlight' that can hunt down prostate metastases, including those too small to appear on conventional detection scans (J.Y. Adams et al., "Visualization of advanced human prostate cancer lesions in living mice by a targeted gene transfer vector and optical imaging," Nature Medicine, 8:891-7, August 2

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Frontlines

By | July 22, 2002

Frontlines Image: Erica Johnson Damage control Researchers have found that inosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside whose levels are elevated in the brain following trauma, can induce axonal reorganization following a stroke and improve the performance of several sensorimotor tasks (P. Chen et al., "Inosine induces axonal rewiring and improves behavioral outcome after stroke," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99:9031-6, June 25, 2002). A stroke can cause massive damage to t

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Frontlines

By | July 8, 2002

Frontlines Image: Erica P. Johnson Stop brain drain now Six of Europe's Nobel laureates chastised the European Union's policies on research funding with a letter to all 12 EU leaders demanding action. The six--three winners of the medicine prize in the 1970s and 1980s, two physicists, and a chemist--want funds doubled to stem the flow of talented young scientists from Europe to the United States. "Brain drain--young talented scientists leaving their countries--is making itself felt in most

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Frontlines

By | June 24, 2002

Volume 16 | Issue 13 | 6 | Jun. 24, 2002 Previous | Next Frontlines MOO over, mouse Photo: ©2001 Jessica Rhiannon Smith When researchers consider disease model options, cows generally remain in the pasture. But a bovine tuberculosis epidemic in the United Kingdom has made the grazers invaluable, not only for studying ways to stymie Mycobacterium bovis, the bovine ver

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