Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist

Hot Paper

Most Recent

Tunicate classification

By | January 1, 2008

Credit: Left: David Hall / Photo Researchers, Inc" /> Credit: Left: David Hall / Photo Researchers, Inc The paper: F. Delsuc et al., "Tunicates and not cephalochordates are the closest living relatives of vertebrates," Nature, 439:965-8, 2006. (Cited in 116 papers) The finding: Using a data set of 146 nuclear genes, including tunicate data from the Oikopleura dioica genome project, Frédéric Delsuc and his colleagues from the Univers

0 Comments

A new nitrifier

By | December 1, 2007

Credit: © Oliver Meckes / Nicole Ottawa / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Oliver Meckes / Nicole Ottawa / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: M. Könneke et al., "Isolation of an autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing marine archaeon," Nature, 437:543-6, 2005. (Cited in 85 papers) The finding: David Stahl and colleagues from the University of Washington and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute were investigating nitrification in the Plum Island Sound e

0 Comments

Bayesian-based trees

By | December 1, 2007

Credit: © Joseph T. & Suzanne L. Collins / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Joseph T. & Suzanne L. Collins / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: M.C. Brandley et al., "Partitioned Bayesian analyses, partition choice, and the phylogenetic relationships of scincid lizards," Systematic Biol, 54:373-90, 2005. (Cited in 73 papers) The finding: Tod Reeder's group at San Diego State University and a Swiss colleague suggested a revise

0 Comments

Signaling neurogenesis

By | December 1, 2007

Credit: MethoxyRoxy / WIKIMEDIA" /> Credit: MethoxyRoxy / WIKIMEDIA The paper: D.C. Lie et al., "Wnt signaling regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis," Nature, 437:1370-5, 2005. (Cited in 79 papers) The finding: After discovering neurogenesis in humans in 1998, Fred Gage's group at the Salk Institute in California went looking for signals that control the phenomenon in rodents. They found that overexpressing the signaling molecule Wnt increased neurogenesis, w

0 Comments

Auto-induction protein production

By | November 1, 2007

Credit: Omikron / Photo Researchers, Inc" /> Credit: Omikron / Photo Researchers, Inc The paper: F.W. Studier, "Protein production by auto-induction in high-density shaking cultures," Protein Express Purif, 41:207-34, 2005. (Cited in 124 papers) The finding: While working on the National Institutes of Health's structural genomics project, William Studier at the Brookhaven National Laboratory devised a method that produced up to 10 times the protein

1 Comment

Mining mammalian genes

By | November 1, 2007

Credit: Courtesy of Piero Carninci" /> Credit: Courtesy of Piero Carninci The paper: The FANTOM Consortium and RIKEN, "The transcriptional landscape of the mammalian genome," Science, 309:1559-63, 2005. (Cited in 251 papers) The finding: Techniques such as cap-analysis gene-expression and gene-identification signature technology allowed a group led by Yoshihide Hayashizaki at the RIKEN Institute in Wako, Japan, to look more in-depth at the mouse tran

0 Comments

This teeming earth

By | November 1, 2007

Credit: Jeremy Burgess / Photo Researchers, Inc" /> Credit: Jeremy Burgess / Photo Researchers, Inc The paper: J. Gans et al., "Computational improvements reveal great bacterial diversity and high metal toxicity in soil," Science, 309:1387-90, 2005. (Cited in 72 papers) The finding: John Dunbar and colleagues at Los Alamos National Laboratory developed a statistical technique to more accurately estimate the diversity of bacteria found in soil. Their reanalysis

3 Comments

Cannabinoid receptor surprise

By | October 1, 2007

Credit: © Dr Neal Scolding / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Dr Neal Scolding / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: M. Van Sickle et al., "Identification and functional characterization of brainstem cannabinoid CB2 receptors," Science, 310: 329?32, 2005. (Cited in 80 papers) The finding: While studying the anti-emetic effects of endogenous cannabinoids in ferrets, Keith Sharkey at the University of Calgary, Canada and collea

0 Comments

Diversity in the gut

By | October 1, 2007

Credit: © Scimat / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Scimat / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: P.B. Eckburg et al., "Diversity of the human intestinal microbial flora," Science, 308:1635-8, 2005. (Cited in 158 papers) The finding: David Relman from Stanford University and colleagues sequenced more than 13,000 ribosomal RNA genes from microbial populations in the gut tissue and feces of three adult humans. "In some ways, thi

0 Comments

Methylation mystery

By | October 1, 2007

Credit: © Kenneth Eward / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Kenneth Eward / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: J. Wysocka et al., "WDR5 associates with histone H3 methylated K4 and is essential for H3K4 methylation and vertebrate development," Cell, 121:859-72, 2005. (Cited in 96 papers) The finding: David Allis from Rockefeller University and colleagues used a biochemical pull-down assay and found that the protein WDR5, a co

0 Comments

Advertisement

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Life Technologies