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Cells fail acid test

By | June 1, 2007

Credit: © Nissim Benvenisty" /> Credit: © Nissim Benvenisty The paper: M.J. Martin et al., "Human embryonic stem cells express an immunogenic nonhuman sialic acid," Nat Med, 11:228-32, 2005. (Cited in 111 papers) The finding: Ajit Varki and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, showed that human embryonic stem cells incorporate a nonhuman immunogenic sialic acid from nonhuman growth serum in typical cell culture.

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Identifying the niche

By | June 1, 2007

Credit: © National Cancer Institute / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © National Cancer Institute / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: M.J. Kiel et al., "SLAM family receptors distinguish hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and reveal endothelial niches for stem cells," Cell, 121:1109-21, 2005. (Cited in 118 papers) The finding: Mark Kiel at the University of Michigan and colleagues compared gene expression profiles from

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New eggs from old mice?

By | June 1, 2007

Credit: © Andy Walker / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Andy Walker / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: J. Johnson et al., "Oocyte generation in adult mammalian ovaries by putative germ cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood," Cell, 122:303-15, 2005. (Cited in 81 papers) The finding: Jonathan Tilly, director of the Vincent center for reproductive biology at Massachusetts Gene

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Birth of an miRNA

By | May 1, 2007

The paper: X. Cai et al., ?Human microRNAs are processed from capped, polyadenylated transcripts that can also function as mRNAs.? RNA, 10:1957?66, 2004. (Cited in 99 papers) The finding: Bryan Cullen and colleagues at Duke University and the University of Kansas investigated the development of human micro-RNAs (miR

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Translocon language

By | May 1, 2007

Credit: Reprinted by permission of Macmillian Publishers, LTD." /> Credit: Reprinted by permission of Macmillian Publishers, LTD. The paper: T. Hessa et al., ?Recognition of transmembrane helices by the endoplasmic reticulum translocon,? Nature, 433:377?81, 2005. (Cited in 88 papers) The finding: Gunnar von Heijn

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Twins diverge

By | May 1, 2007

Credit: © Helen McArdle / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Helen McArdle / Photo Researchers, Inc. The paper: M.F. Fraga, et al. ?Epigenetic differences arise during the lifetime of monozygotic twins.? Proc Natl Acad Sci, 102:10413?4, 2005. (cited in 91 papers) The finding:

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Metabolism gets clocked

By | April 1, 2007

The paper: F.W. Turek et al., "Obesity and metabolic syndrome in circadian Clock mutant mice." Science, 308:1043, 2005. (Cited in 90 papers) The finding: Joe Bass and others at Northwestern University found that mice with a mutated Clock gene showed both abnormal circadian rhythms and feeding behavior. Metabolic problems included obesity and abnormally high levels of blood cholesterol. The surprise: Circadian variatio

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New designs on imatinib

By | April 1, 2007

Credit: COURTESY OF ELSEVIER" /> Credit: COURTESY OF ELSEVIER The paper: E. Weisberg et al., "Characterization of AMN107, a selective inhibitor of native and mutant Bcr-Abl," Cancer Cell, 7:129-41, February 2005. (Cited in 89 papers) The finding: Imatinib (Gleevec) stunned the world with its high cure rate for chronic myeloid leukemia through the inhibition of tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. But, BCR-ABL mutations are a common cause of relapse

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Oncogene roles in moles

By | April 1, 2007

Credit: © STEPHEN J. KRASEMANN / PHOTO RESEARCHERS, INC" /> Credit: © STEPHEN J. KRASEMANN / PHOTO RESEARCHERS, INC The paper: C. Michaloglou et al., "BRAFE600-associated senescence-like cell cycle arrest of human naevi," Nature, 436:720-4, 2005. (Cited in 92 papers) The finding: Two groups of researchers from the Netherlands teamed up with US colleagues to show that the introduction of oncogene BRAFE600 induced cell-cycle arrest in human

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Networking E. coli

By | March 1, 2007

The paper: G. Butland et al., "Interaction network containing conserved and essential protein complexes in Escherichia coli,' Nature, 433:531-7, 2005. (Cited in 91 papers) The finding: Jack Greenblatt and Andrew Emili from the University of Toronto led a team of Canadian researchers that produced a large-scale map of a bacterial interaction network by tagging and purifying protein complexes from 23% of the Escherichia coli genome.

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