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The Agenda

April 1, 2007

Credit: DENISE WYLLIE, www.wyllieohagan.com" /> Credit: DENISE WYLLIE, www.wyllieohagan.com WOMEN IN SCIENCE>> The new Rosalind Franklin Society, which aims to encourage women's participation in science, holds its inaugural meeting April 6 at The Rockefeller University in New York City. For more information, E-mail mliebert@liebertpub.com. VACCINE VENTURES>> After you read the feature on global vaccine policy on page 48 register for the Tenth Annual Confer

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The sniffling sheep

By | April 1, 2007

Alkis Psaltis has seen more than his share of sheep with the sniffles. Over the past year or two, in the course of researching the role of bacterial biofilms in sinusitis, woolly ruminants with nasal congestion have become almost a daily event for the scientist at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Adelaide, Australia. "Basically, the sheep get runny noses," Psaltis explains. "They get a purulent discharge and all the signs of an inflammatory response, including frank pus and friable muc

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The whirling fish kill

By | April 1, 2007

Rainbow Trout affected by whirling disease." />Rainbow Trout affected by whirling disease. In the early hours of a frigid March morning, a dozen men in waders and coveralls plunge into the icy raceway waters of the Bear Creek fish-rearing station in Accident, Md. Using large plastic baskets, they haul more than 50 pounds at a time of rainbow trout out of the cold water and into even colder air, where the fish are weighed and then tossed into a front-end loader, to be trucked to a plan

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A cartoon funds research

By | March 1, 2007

Credit: Stephen Pincock" /> Credit: Stephen Pincock The oversized, fluffy "Taz" looks decidedly out of place in the gift shop at Narawntapu national park, a wildlife-rich reserve on the north coast of Tasmania. Nearly two feet high, it looms over a small selection of other, more refined, souvenirs. But the plush toy, modeled on Warner Brothers' whirlwind Looney Tunes cartoon character, is on sale for a good cause. Each one raises money for research into Devil Facial Tumor Diseas

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Mummies' parasites

By | March 1, 2007

Ana Vicente and her team at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in Rio de Janeiro began their quest for ancient pinworm RNA at San Pedro de Atacama, a pre-Incan village that was once part of an important trade route to the Pacific coast. Considered the driest place on earth, the region boasts 35 mm of rainfall in its wettest years and is considered a veritable time capsule for archaeologists, says paleoparasitologist Adauto Araujo, "There are so many bodies there, that archaeologists no longe

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Nobelist's QVC debut

By | March 1, 2007

Credit: courtesy of world Almanac library" /> Credit: courtesy of world Almanac library Somewhere between "Bracelet Showcase" and "Now You're Cooking" biologist Ferid Murad made his QVC television debut on January 21, 2007. The winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology graced the studios of one of the largest American home shopping television networks to hawk his new book, The Wellness Solution, penned with QVC's own Medical Wellness Doctor Edward Taub. Taub's regular

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The Agenda

March 1, 2007

POSTDOCS UNITE » Check out our annual survey of the Best Places to Work for postdocs here. Then register for the 2007 National Postdoc Association Annual Meeting in Berkeley, California, from March 30 to April 1. For more information go to www.nationalpostdoc.org. ANTI-AGING » The strategies described here meant to create the everlasting human still belong to the future, but there are plenty of ways to make humans appear ageless now. In Monaco, from March 22-24, physi

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The biotech contrarian

By | March 1, 2007

Joseph Cortright" />Joseph Cortright If you've been to any Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) convention in the past several years, you'll have noticed dozens of booths staffed by economic development officials from all over the world, all working to lure biotech investment in their regions. Biotech, many seem to believe, is one of the most important drivers of growth and jobs. Joe Cortright disagrees. The economist and vice president of Impresa Consulting in Portland, Oreg

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The self-experimenter

By | March 1, 2007

For an hour each morning Seth Roberts gazes at his own visage in the mirror. His experiments have convinced him that the practice elevates his mood. Credit: Courtesy of Gordy Slack" />For an hour each morning Seth Roberts gazes at his own visage in the mirror. His experiments have convinced him that the practice elevates his mood. Credit: Courtesy of Gordy Slack The last thing Seth Roberts does each night is turn on his bedside timer, and the first thing he does each morning is switch

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Defending conservation

By | February 1, 2007

http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/2/1/17/100/ View a slideshow: bombs and biodiversity at Warren Grove Military planes roar over Warren Grove Gunnery Range in southern New Jersey. A puff of smoke spreads across a clear-cut strip of land where a dummy bomb has just kissed its practice target. From the top of the air traffic control tower Captain Rich DeFeo, the base's environmental manager, points to the hazy skyline of Atlantic City on the horizon. Between h

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