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Reuse, or recycle?

By | November 1, 2008

Credit: Courtesy of Sorenson BioScience" /> Credit: Courtesy of Sorenson BioScience In labs across the world, heaping piles of pipette tip boxes spill out of trashcans and onto the floor. A single lab can burn through hundreds of pipette tips in an hour, creating enormous waste. In an attempt to minimize the waste, Jonathan Trent's protein chemistry lab at NASA AMES reuses all of its micropipette tip boxes.

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A bee's life

By | October 1, 2008

A member of the Augochlorine bee family pollinates a tomato flower. Credit: Courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service" />A member of the Augochlorine bee family pollinates a tomato flower. Credit: Courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service On an organic farm in central New Jersey, the plants are vibrating with bees. With a swift twist of her insect net, Rachael Winfree captures a wild bee s

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Bacteria Gladiators

By | October 1, 2008

When a new antibiotic isolated from Rhodococcus fascians is dripped onto a paper disc (white) in the middle of a plate full of other bacteria (orange), all the bacteria near the filter disc die. Credit: ® Kazuhiko Kurosawa" />When a new antibiotic isolated from Rhodococcus fascians is dripped onto a paper disc (white) in the middle of a plate full of other bacteria (orange), all the bacteria near the filter

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Nabbing bats' nemesis

By | October 1, 2008

A little brown bat is inspected for signs of white nose syndrome. Credit: Courtesy of Kathryn Campbell" />A little brown bat is inspected for signs of white nose syndrome. Credit: Courtesy of Kathryn Campbell Wearing a mining helmet, Greg Turner scales a wobbly 30 foot ladder and squeezes his 6' 2" frame into the window of an abandoned white clapboard church. On

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NO problem

By | October 1, 2008

Two years ago, whenever members of Jon Lundberg's team at Karolinska University wanted to get near their lab mice, they donned sterile gloves and reached into a steel isolator box. Not typical research rodents, these creatures had been bred to be completely germ-free. The technicians in the animal lab delivered the baby mice by cesarean section and kept them in complete isolation to eliminate the

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Pimp my poster

By | October 1, 2008

A poster illustrating anatomy and photosynthesis in corn, by Michael Franklin, Rochester Institute of Technology, on Purrington's Flickr page. Credit: COURTESY OF Michael Franklin / Rochester Institute of Technology" />A poster illustrating anatomy and photosynthesis in corn, by Michael Franklin, Rochester Institute of Technology, on Purrington's Flickr page. Credit: COURTESY OF Michael Franklin / Rochester Institute of Technology

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Biotech in space?

By | September 1, 2008

The experimental chamber used in space. Credit: Courtesy of BioServe Space Technologies / University of Colorado" />The experimental chamber used in space. Credit: Courtesy of BioServe Space Technologies / University of Colorado This spring, the Space Shuttle Discovery carried some interesting cargo: Salmonella bacteria separated by a thin seal from their target host, C.elegans. The cargo came courtesy of SPACEHAB, a Texas-based

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Judgment Day

By | September 1, 2008

Heartbreak came in three acts at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City this summer: animal, vegetable, and mineral. It was Identification Day and museum-goers lugged their scientific treasures triple-wrapped in newspaper, towels, and Hefty garbage bags and tucked inside rolling suitcases, duffels, Coleman coolers, and zippered pants pockets. Local experts waited to receive them wit

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Maggot sleuthing

By | September 1, 2008

Richard Merritt Credit: Photo by G.L. Kohuth / Michigan State University" />Richard Merritt Credit: Photo by G.L. Kohuth / Michigan State University Two years ago, entomologist Richard Merritt from Michigan State University pulled an all-nighter in a Toronto hotel room to prepare for seven hours of testimony about a court case so controversial it precipitated the abolition of Canada's death penalty. As part of his te

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T cells and tears

By | September 1, 2008

Dama Laxminarayana processes a lupus patient's blood by centrifugation to obtain white blood cells. Credit: © creative Communications / WFUSM" />Dama Laxminarayana processes a lupus patient's blood by centrifugation to obtain white blood cells. Credit: © creative Communications / WFUSM On the third floor of a molecular biology lab in Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, immunologist Dama Laxmina

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