Advertisement

Notebook

Most Recent

Whence this fish?

By | September 1, 2008

The Chiapas catfish's chocolate-brown color and white chin barbels are truly enigmatic. Credit: Courtesy of John Lundberg" />The Chiapas catfish's chocolate-brown color and white chin barbels are truly enigmatic. Credit: Courtesy of John Lundberg In February 2005, John Lundberg, an evolutionary biologist at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, obtained molecular data from a tissue sample that

3 Comments

Baiting Ebola

By | August 1, 2008

Chimps testing the Ebola vaccine bait Credit: Courtesy of IDT Biologika. Credit: Andrea Schaenzler" />Chimps testing the Ebola vaccine bait Credit: Courtesy of IDT Biologika. Credit: Andrea Schaenzler At the Leipzig zoo's Wolfgang Köhler Primate Research Center last summer, a 3-year-old female gorilla named Kibara was going berserk. She had just been given a new type of food, deep-red colored candies with a rich mango scent. Kib

1 Comment

Beta eye-lets

By | August 1, 2008

Clusters of beta islet cells engrafted under a mouse's cornea, showing some vascularization of the implanted cells. Credit: Courtesy of Stephan Speier" />Clusters of beta islet cells engrafted under a mouse's cornea, showing some vascularization of the implanted cells. Credit: Courtesy of Stephan Speier Looking through the lens of his confocal microscope, Per-Olof Berggren peers at the colonies of beta cells

1 Comment

Guts to glory

By | August 1, 2008

Kirsty Spalding never expected to start her biology postdoc standing in a Swedish slaughterhouse, dressed in white overalls and rubber boots amidst blood and gore and stink, while smashing the teeth out of decapitated horses' heads with a hammer. But that's exactly where the young Australian scientist found herself, every second Tuesday in 2002 for two months at the beginning of her postdoc in the l

0 Comments

Thick bones, big drug

By | August 1, 2008

It was 1994, and Scott Simonet of Amgen's molecular genetics department in Thousand Oaks, Calif., was looking at some strange X-rays. He had engineered five transgenic mouse lines to overexpress a mysterious secreted protein. The mice looked and behaved normally, but that ordinariness was only skin-deep. "On the X-rays, it was pretty obvious that the long bones had higher bone mineral density," says

1 Comment

A Southern mystery

By | July 1, 2008

In 2004, strange things were happening when people living in the Southern United States received Erbitux, an anticancer drug. After Erbitux was approved, the first three patients that oncologist Bert O'Neil treated at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, had severe anaphylactic reactions. "One fell out of their chair," passing out as blood pressure plummeted. "It alarmed us."

1 Comment

A Sultan's gift?

By | July 1, 2008

A Bornean Pygmy elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) in Sabah, North Borneo, Malaysia. Credit: © WWF-Canon / A. Christy WILLIAMS" />A Bornean Pygmy elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) in Sabah, North Borneo, Malaysia. Credit: © WWF-Canon / A. Christy WILLIAMS In 2003, researchers published a paper in PLoS Biology that came to a conclusion often reached by biologists studying unique, island-bound s

1 Comment

Drug fishing

By | July 1, 2008

Three day old transgenic zebrafish in which a blue fluorescent protein is expressed under control of the cardiac myosin light chain 2 promoter. Credit: Courtesy of Peter Schlueter" />Three day old transgenic zebrafish in which a blue fluorescent protein is expressed under control of the cardiac myosin light chain 2 promoter. Credit: Courtesy of Peter Schlueter In one tank at the zebrafish fac

0 Comments

Good golly, miss molly

By | July 1, 2008

The Amazon molly Credit: Courtesy of Kathrin Lampert" />The Amazon molly Credit: Courtesy of Kathrin Lampert In 1932, two University of Michigan fish ecologists, Carl and Laura Hubbs, reported in Science that they had the first experimental proof of a clonally reproducing vertebrate. What they found in the lakes and streams of northeastern Mexico and southern Texas was a smal

0 Comments

Cave crawler

By | June 1, 2008

Hazel Barton with a gypsum formation. Credit: Courtesy of Dave Bunnell / Under Earth Images" />Hazel Barton with a gypsum formation. Credit: Courtesy of Dave Bunnell / Under Earth Images Three years ago, Hazel Barton, a biologist from Northern Kentucky University, traveled to southern Venezuela to star in an Animal Planet documentary entitled "The Real Lost World." While there, she visited Mount Roraima, the largest

0 Comments

Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
BioTek
BioTek
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Life Technologies