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Finding the false

By | June 1, 2008

For Mike Rossner, the impetus to look for image manipulation came suddenly. In 2002, when Rossner was the managing editor at the Journal of Cell Biology, the journal switched to completely electronic submissions. One of the first submissions after the change contained unusable PowerPoint images. In the process of reformatting, Rossner, now executive director of Rockefeller Press, di

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Inducing autism

By | June 1, 2008

A monkey at the CNPRC Credit: Courtesy of Katherine West / CNPRC" />A monkey at the CNPRC Credit: Courtesy of Katherine West / CNPRC It was the spring of 2005, and some of the rhesus monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center were behaving oddly. Specifically, they were climbing to the top of their chain-linked cages and flipping over backwards, over and over. Others were pacing frantically

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The worm hunter

By | June 1, 2008

Torch Ginger flower in which a new species of Caenorhabditis was found. Credit: Courtesy of Valérie Robert" />Torch Ginger flower in which a new species of Caenorhabditis was found. Credit: Courtesy of Valérie Robert In December 2007, Marie-Anne Félix was taking a small cruise along the southwestern coast of India when she found herself docked in a remote lagoon in the backwate

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A life behind life science

By | May 1, 2008

Noreen O'Neill, who died of melanoma in July, 2000. Credit: Courtesy of the O'Neill family" />Noreen O'Neill, who died of melanoma in July, 2000. Credit: Courtesy of the O'Neill family Meenhard Herlyn studied melanoma for 20 years before he ever met a single patient with the disease. He has published more than 380 papers on melanoma and other cancers, in which he discovered monoclonal antibod

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Brain quakes

By | May 1, 2008

Two decades ago, neurologist Ivan Osorio realized that he and his peers were stuck. Specifically, they were "making little progress" understanding "one of medicine's most intriguing intellectual challenges" - sudden, often debilitating surges of brain electrical activity known as epileptic seizures. So Osorio decided to look outside clinical medicine. He discovered tha

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New look at old wounds

By | May 1, 2008

James Bedell's cranium was cracked by a Confederate saber in 1863 and now resides in Washington, DC. Credit: Courtesy of National Museum of Health and Medicine, surgical photograph no. 8" />James Bedell's cranium was cracked by a Confederate saber in 1863 and now resides in Washington, DC. Credit: Courtesy of National Museum of Health and Medicine, surgical photograph no. 8 One of the

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Speciation's roots?

By | May 1, 2008

A normal Arabidopsis plant (center), surrounded by different hybrids formed by crossing two healthy plants. Credit: Kirsten Bomblies and Detlef Weigel, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen" />A normal Arabidopsis plant (center), surrounded by different hybrids formed by crossing two healthy plants. Credit: Kirsten Bomblies and Detlef Weigel, Max Planck

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The media monitor

By | May 1, 2008

Timothy Caulfield Credit: © Creative Services, University of Alberta" />Timothy Caulfield Credit: © Creative Services, University of Alberta Timothy Caulfield has spent years listening to scientists complain that the media does a poor job of explaining science. As research director of the Health Law Institute at the University of Alberta, he has heard this so often, he says, that he started to believe it too. Finally, he decided to find o

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A Jewish pig geneticist

By | April 1, 2008

Max Rothschild (left) in Uganda. Credit: courtesy of Max Rothschild" />Max Rothschild (left) in Uganda. Credit: courtesy of Max Rothschild The Rothschild lineage is often associated with Jewish tradition, banking, and fantastic wines. But Max Rothschild, a researcher at Iowa State University, is associated with some decidedly nonkosher animals: pigs. And, more recently, shrimp. When he was about 7 or 8 years old, Rothschild had a different kind

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A trial, decoded

By | April 1, 2008

Hákon Hákonarson and deCODE genetics CEO Kári Stefánsson used to consider each other friends. Hákonarson, the former vice president of business development at the Icelandic biopharmaceutical company, used to ride horses with Stefánsson and spend time with him outside of work. That all ended in May, 2006, when Hákonarson left deCODE to direct and help form the new Center for Applie

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