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Doctor double dip

By | April 1, 2008

Log cfu/ml of bacteria recovered from sterile water in which crackers had been dipped 3 or 6 times, discarded after each dip, with or without being bitten before dipping. Credit: Data courtesy of Paul Dawson" />Log cfu/ml of bacteria recovered from sterile water in which crackers had been dipped 3 or 6 times, discarded after each dip, with or without being bitten before dipping. Credit: Data courtesy of Paul Dawson Who hasn't in

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Going batty

By | April 1, 2008

A flying fox Credit: Right: courtesy of Australian Animal Health Laboratory" />A flying fox Credit: Right: courtesy of Australian Animal Health Laboratory Taking a saliva sample from the world's largest bat is not easy under ordinary circumstances, but obtaining that same sample from a SARS-infected flying fox — while using a 4-foot cotton swab and wearing a pressurized biosafety suit with double-layered rub

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More mice by mail?

By | April 1, 2008

A Taconic animal care technician inspects a genetically engineered mouse model in a gnotobiotic isolator at the Germantown, NY facility. Credit: Courtesy of Taconic" />A Taconic animal care technician inspects a genetically engineered mouse model in a gnotobiotic isolator at the Germantown, NY facility. Credit: Courtesy of Taconic In the world of lab-mouse breeders, only a few players are in the big leagues. In re

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An abnormal reunion

By | March 1, 2008

Judy and George Reimer, who met as healthy volunteers and married Credit: Photo by Bill Branson, NIH Medical Arts. Photo courtesy of the NIH Clinical Center" />Judy and George Reimer, who met as healthy volunteers and married Credit: Photo by Bill Branson, NIH Medical Arts. Photo courtesy of the NIH Clinical Center In 1958, Jim Conrad, a Mennonite from Oregon, volunteered to eat the same solid foods every day for several weeks, then nothing but corn oil and skim mil

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Immunity for breakfast?

By | March 1, 2008

What if preventing millions of deaths in children every year were as simple as a little transgenic technology and a favorite food that's a dime a dozen, proverbially speaking? To Peter Lachmann, at the University of Cambridge in England, it might be just that straightforward. Related Articles Science Applied to the Greatest Needs Implementing Change Lab Transformation Lachmann is convinced that antibody-enriched egg whites may be the key

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Lab transformation

By | March 1, 2008

Aedes aegypti mosquito larva with a PTEN homolog and DsRed marker inserted into its genome. Credit: courtesy of Robert Harrell" />Aedes aegypti mosquito larva with a PTEN homolog and DsRed marker inserted into its genome. Credit: courtesy of Robert Harrell Dave O'Brochta places his fingers on a net that covers the top of a bucket containing hundreds of Anopheles stephensi, a mosquito responsible for transmitting malaria. The mosquitoes slowly g

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Poppy power

By | March 1, 2008

Philip Larkin examines the last of his transgenic poppies growing in a greenhouse at the Black Mountain Laboratory in Canberra, Australia. Credit: Courtesy of Brendan Borrell" />Philip Larkin examines the last of his transgenic poppies growing in a greenhouse at the Black Mountain Laboratory in Canberra, Australia. Credit: Courtesy of Brendan Borrell Out of a dozen transgenic plants in Philip Larkin's greenhouse at Black Mountain Laboratory in Canberra, only two sho

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Supercharging proteins

By | March 1, 2008

David Liu's group supercharged green fluorescent protein (left) with a super positive (middle) and super negative (right) charge. Credit: David Liu / Reprinted with permission from American Chemical Society,J Am Chem Soc, 129:10110–2, 2007." />David Liu's group supercharged green fluorescent protein (left) with a super positive (middle) and super negative (right) charge. Credit: David Liu / Reprinted with permission from American Chemical Society,J Am Chem Soc, 129:

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Calling charlatans

By | February 1, 2008

One day last summer, a customer service representative for a company called Crystalite Salt received a phone call from Jennifer Lardge, a physicist. Lardge was curious about the science behind one of their products: lumps of salt, called lamps, that are meant to improve your health when they are heated. "I was looking at your Web site and I was just wondering about how salt lamps actually work," Lardge said. "Right," responded the Crystalite Salt customer service representativ

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Evolution, over easy

By | February 1, 2008

Credit: © Edward Kinsman / Photo Researchers, Inc." /> Credit: © Edward Kinsman / Photo Researchers, Inc. You might say that Charles Kerfoot, an ecologist at Michigan Technological University, can raise the dead. The crustacean eggs that Kerfoot reanimates in his laboratory technically have no perceptible metabolism, so by a strict physiologic definition, they are, essentially, not living. But Kerfoot manages to hatch living crustaceans from these eggs, some of whom have be

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