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PhDs and parishioners

By | December 1, 2007

In late 2004, Michael Zimmerman, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of biology at Butler University, was watching early media coverage of the Dover, Pa., intelligent design trial, which broadcast several fundamentalist ministers condemning evolution, and felt frustrated. What he saw was a war between science and religion, and science was losing. So Zimmerman decided to call for a truce. He asked a friend, a member of the clergy, to draft a letter to religious

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Baby brain bank

By | November 1, 2007

Related Articles A Channel at Large The Inner Workings of Hearing Machinery Cracking Open a New Channel Family Channel Candidates Facelessness, faced The singing ear Alzheimer's: Type 3 Diabetes? Model of insulin's influence on amyloid β Opening Potassium Channels to Scrutiny Manna from hell Birth of a plant Clerkship in Croatia Buzzing for bombs Slideshow: A mysterious kidney disease Unlocking one of many nondescript doors in a long hallway at the Croatian Institute for Brain

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Buzzing for bombs

By | November 1, 2007

Related Articles Manna from hell Birth of a plant Clerkship in Croatia Baby brain bank Slideshow: A mysterious kidney disease From ten meters away, the sound of a million honeybees is surprisingly soothing, like treetops whooshing in the breeze. At a daring six meters, the droning becomes ominous and insistent. At two meters away, the humming is so malevolent that the sky seems to darken. "Beautiful music, yes?" says Nikola Kezić, as if there is no doubt. Arranging folding ch

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Facelessness, faced

By | November 1, 2007

Related Articles A Channel at Large The Inner Workings of Hearing Machinery Cracking Open a New Channel Family Channel Candidates The singing ear Baby brain bank Alzheimer's: Type 3 Diabetes? Model of insulin's influence on amyloid β Opening Potassium Channels to Scrutiny After giving a lecture in Windsor, England last February, neuroscientist Bradley Duchaine was approached by a man who'd been in the audience. He told Duchaine, professor at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscienc

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Frog killer

By | November 1, 2007

The already-endangered Atelopus zeteki (Panamanian Golden Frog) is now facing extermination from the Bd fungus." />The already-endangered Atelopus zeteki (Panamanian Golden Frog) is now facing extermination from the Bd fungus. While working on her PhD in 1992, Karen Lips went to Las Tablas, Panama, to study the biology of a tree frog, Hyla calypso, an inch-long, spiny, bright-green creature. As she walked through transects in the forest, measuring and sexing frog individuals, here and

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The singing ear

By | November 1, 2007

Related Articles A Channel at Large The Inner Workings of Hearing Machinery Cracking Open a New Channel Family Channel Candidates Facelessness, faced Baby brain bank Alzheimer's: Type 3 Diabetes? Model of insulin's influence on amyloid β Opening Potassium Channels to Scrutiny About 16 years ago, Ralph Harvey, an anesthesiology professor at the University of Tennessee's College of Veterinary Medicine, walked into an examination room where a small, white poodle sat atop an examinat

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Fashioning conservation

By | October 1, 2007

Credit: Courtesy of Save China's Tigers" /> Credit: Courtesy of Save China's Tigers A steel cage-covered jeep barrels through the gates at the Siberian Tiger Park in Harbin, China, and tosses out a scrawny pheasant. A few lazily sunbathing tigers lift their heads in curiosity. In a matter of seconds, one tiger leaps toward the confused creature, which musters up enough energy to flutter away. But, the bird's small victory is short-lived: The tiger, followed by several freeloaders, ch

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Koalas vs. chlamydia

By | October 1, 2007

Prepping a koala for a procedure Credit: Courtesy of Stephen Pincock" />Prepping a koala for a procedure Credit: Courtesy of Stephen Pincock Peering through a fringe of eucalyptus leaves, Don the koala greets visitors with an air of unmistakable curiosity. His large and sensitive nose can easily detect the scent of unfamiliar humans, but his tiny eyes seem much less useful. Swollen and half covered by inflamed eyelids, they've been reduced to slits by debilitating conjunctivitis.

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Poop tracking

By | October 1, 2007

As she walks into her microbiology laboratory at Oregon State University, Kate Field hands her graduate student a Ziploc bag full of tubes of fecal samples. "These are just in from New Zealand," she says with a smile. For just being handed what essentially amounts to a bag of poop, her graduate student seems pretty excited as well. Now, the student's job is to test whether the genetic markers Field has developed can reliably identify what type of animal produced the sample. "Right no

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Scorpion tags tumors

By | October 1, 2007

Fluorescence indicates chlorotoxin binding to medulloblastoma cells in a mouse (right). Credit: Image by Mandana Veiseh, courtesy of AACR" />Fluorescence indicates chlorotoxin binding to medulloblastoma cells in a mouse (right). Credit: Image by Mandana Veiseh, courtesy of AACR Within minutes after being stung by the scorpion known as the deathstalker (Leiurus quinquestriatus), weakness starts to kick in. The feeling quickly spreads, paralyzing its prey (typically insects) for hours -

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