Research

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Retroelements Guide Adaptation

By | January 31, 2005

With inquisitive minds and tools as simple as a Waring blender, the work of early phage researchers such as Max Delbruck, Seymour Benzer, and Alfred Hershey generated much of the knowledge underlying contemporary molecular biology.

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RNAi Screens Seek Cancer Genes

By | January 31, 2005

RNA interference (RNAi) is fast becoming an essential tool for academic and industrial labs searching for genes that promote or inhibit cancer.

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Did Enzymes Evolve to Capitalize on Quantum Tunneling?

By | January 17, 2005

In the early years of the 20th century, a new theory, quantum mechanics, revolutionized physicists' understanding of nature.

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Dieting for the Genome Generation

By | January 17, 2005

More than 2,000 years ago, Hippocrates wrote: "Leave your drugs in the chemist's pot if you can heal the patient with food."

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Darwin Meets Chomsky

By | December 20, 2004

Charles Darwin spotted it.

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Gene Association Studies Typically Wrong

By | December 20, 2004

The first published study linking gene to disease is often far from the last word on the subject.

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Spite: Evolution Finally Gets Nasty

By | December 20, 2004

The body of a caterpillar is the site of both a great feast and a gruesome familial struggle.

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Brain Imaging Struggles for Psychiatric Respect

By | December 6, 2004

Psychiatrists can draw upon long clinical experience with adult patients to surmise why antidepressant medications foster suicidal thoughts and behavior in some children, as the US Food and Drug Administration warned this fall.

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Sir2: Scrambling for Answers

By | December 6, 2004

Low-calorie diets extend lifespan in almost every model tested, but scientists can't yet agree on what controls this phenomenon.

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Brains and Genes in Perfect Clarity

By | November 22, 2004

Deciphering genetic relationships in cognitive function takes serious effort.

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