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It's About Who You Know ...

By | November 7, 2005

Function at Hunter College of the City University of New York is among the most diverse in the sciences.

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Lafayette Frederick

By | November 7, 2005

Lafayette Frederick was born in Dog Bog, Mississippi, and grew up with five brothers and sisters on a cotton farm in Missouri, where his sharecropper father taught him and other local kids in a one-room schoolhouse that doubled as a church.

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Leading by Example

By | November 7, 2005

The first in her family to go to college, Jocelyn Nadeau entered Smith College intending to major in psychology.

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Marietta Vazquez

By | November 7, 2005

Growing up in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Marietta Vazquez' doctor's visits would often turn into long question-and-answer sessions.

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Representing the Real World

November 7, 2005

The Scientist spoke to four distinguished scientists, all belonging to "underrepresented groups," about their experiences and their views on diversity.

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Resources

November 7, 2005

This resource guide lists a selection of scholarships, grants, organizations, and other support targeted to underrepresented groups, including individuals with disabilities.

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When Juan Magana applied to University of California, Berkeley, at his sister's urging, he didn't know much about the school.

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The Guide

November 7, 2005

It's all about who you know, they say, and success in the life sciences is no exception.

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The Outlook

November 7, 2005

The business and scientific value of diversity is discussed frequently, but building a truly diverse workforce is much easier said than done.

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The Profiles

November 7, 2005

In this section, seven prominent life scientists from underrepresented groups in academia and industry talk about their lives and career paths.

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