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A Delicate Balance

By | March 28, 2005

Ever since the United States government passed laws governing the prescription of opioid drugs early in the 20th century, doctors and regulators have been engaged in a balancing act, trying to use the drugs to treat pain appropriately while preventing their abuse.

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A Sketch of the Subjective

By | March 28, 2005

Although pain is highly subjective, understanding the common underlying pathways that form an outline for pain perception holds clues to better control.

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Animal Models of Pain

March 28, 2005

Non-human animals have served as valuable models in many types of biomedical investigations, but when it comes to pain, some assumptions are necessary.

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Under the suggestive power of hypnosis, subjects can be convinced that they're feeling pain when no stimulus is given.

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Attuning to a Life in Pain

By | March 28, 2005

One Tuesday morning in March 1990, 19-year-old Shannon Leidig, a freshman music therapy major at Virginia's Shenandoah College and Conservatory of Music, woke up with a burning, throbbing pain in her right hand.

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Belief and Narrative

By | March 28, 2005

Culture shapes human pain. Lesions, neurons, neu rotransmitters, and genes may provide a starting point for an exploration of pain's roots in animal models, but among humans, it is our culture as well as our biology that invariably shapes pain.

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Conus

By | March 28, 2005

Bert Myers/Photo Researchers Inc.This past December, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Prialt, Elan Corporation's synthetic version of a peptide from the venomous sea snail Conus magus. The drug, ziconotide, is the first of its kind and appears to alleviate severe pain by blocking N-type Ca+ channels.Ziconotide is designed from one of about 100 pharmacologically active compounds in C. magus. And this undersea combinatorial chemist is only one of approximately 500 Conus species. Resear

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COX-2 Studies Stymied

By | March 28, 2005

When Merck pulled its blockbuster painkiller, Vioxx, from the market on Celebrex and Bextra, Prexige, which is manufactured by Novartis, and Sept. 30, 2004, after a large clinical trial provided evidence that the drug increased the risk of heart attack and stroke, the move cast doubts on the safety of similar Cox-2-specific inhibitors, including Pfizer's another Merck drug, Arcoxia.

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Dealing with Pain

By | March 28, 2005

Pain is indelibly interwoven into the fabric of human experience.

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From Nerves to Immunity

March 28, 2005

Ten years ago, pediatric neuroblastoma patients at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), were receiving an experimental anti-body treatment.

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