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Survey Questions

By | April 1, 2013

Best Places to Work Postdocs

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An Insoluble Problem?

By | May 1, 2011

By Robert Michael Stroud An Insoluble Problem? The challenges of crystallizing membrane proteins—and how they’re being overcome Computer artwork of a G protein-coupled receptor in the lipid bilayer of a plasma membrane Medi-Mation Ltd / Photo Researchers Membrane proteins represent only a handful of the total number of protein structures defined to date. Yet these proteins, which represent nearly 40 percent of all known proteins, including recepto

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Andrew Carter: Dynein Trailblazer

By | May 1, 2011

By Hannah Waters Andrew Carter: Dynein Trailblazer Nick Morrish Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Medical Research Council. Age: 36 The typical biologist’s desk is strewn with reprints and lab notebooks, maybe a coffee cup, perhaps a small model of a DNA molecule. Structural biologist Andrew Carter’s workspace has all these things, but a cluster of framed dog photographs stands out amid the clutter: his collection of corgi pictu

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Best Places to Work Industry, 2011

By | May 1, 2011

By Hannah Waters Best Places to Work Industry, 2011 By forging new relationships and finding novel uses for existing technologies, this year’s top companies are employing creative ways to advance their science. Like the reeds of an old Aesop fable, the companies that topped our 2011 Best Places to Work in Industry survey are bending—but not breaking—under the strain of continued economic adversity. With funding agencies still awarding grants onl

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Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club

By | May 1, 2011

By Laura J. Snyder Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club In Chapter 8, “A Divine Programmer,” author Laura J. Snyder explains how Darwin’s own ideas on evolution may have been influenced at lavish parties hosted by one of the club’s members, Charles Babbage On Monday, February 27, 1837, Charles Darwin delivered a talk at a meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Darwin wrote to his sister Caroline that night with news of

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2011

By Bob Grant Capsule Reviews Biopunk: DIY Scientists Hack the Software of Life by Marcus Wohlsen Current, April 2011 In the 1970s brash, young mavericks like Bill Gates and Apple’s two Steves (Wozniak and Jobs) toiled in their respective garages creating software and hardware that would one day revolutionize society’s relationship with computers—all without the benefit of towering office high-rises or financial backing from investors with

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Compact Model T

By | May 1, 2011

By Hannah Waters Compact Model T Dr. Klaus Boller / Photo Researchers, Inc (Human T Cell during Metaphase) The paper J.S. Rawlings et al., “Chromatin condensation via the condensin II complex is required for peripheral T-cell quiescence,” The EMBO Journal, 30:263-76, 2011. Free F1000 Evaluation The finding Naïve T cells remain in a quiescent state, becoming activated only when they encounter their complementary antigen during an immune res

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Contributors

By | May 1, 2011

Contributors Lewis Wolpert was raised in South Africa where he trained to become a civil engineer specializing in soil mechanics, which he abandoned for cell biology in 1955. “A friend told me that soil mechanics wasn’t very sexy and that some of my work could be relevant to the study of cell mechanics,” he says. After obtaining a PhD from University of London, King’s College, Wolpert focused on morphogenesis with a special interest in the p

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Control from Without

By | May 1, 2011

By Richard P. Grant Control from Without Courtesy of Bruce Vogel (hemicentin-GFP in C. elegans) The paper X. Xu, B.E. Vogel, “A secreted protein promotes cleavage furrow maturation during cytokinesis,” Curr Biol, 21:114-19, 2011. Free F1000 Evaluation The finding Successful cell division is critical to the survival of all life and depends on the coordinated actions of dozens of proteins. Bruce Vogel, at the University of Maryland in Baltimore

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Going with the Flow

By | May 1, 2011

By Kelly Rae Chi Going with the Flow A guide to the new wave of budget, easy-to-use flow cytometers In January Tim Bushnell, scientific and technical director of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Flow Cytometry Core in New York State, packed a $50,000 flow cytometer in his car and drove it to a lab 15 minutes away. There, he trained beginners to use the technique—which identifies and sorts specific populations of cells—on the new benchtop

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