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Hangover Headache

By | May 1, 2011

By Hannah Waters Hangover Headache Alfred Pasieka / Photo Researchers, Inc The paper C.R. Maxwell et al., “Acetate causes alcohol hangover headache in rats,” PLoS ONE, 5:e15963, 2010. Free F1000 Evaluation The finding While many people get a headache after drinking alcohol, migraineurs have more severe headaches induced by fewer drinks. Using a rat model of migraines, Michael Oshinsky of Thomas Jefferson University and colleagues show that the

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If Bacteria Can Do It?

By | May 1, 2011

By H. Steven Wiley If Bacteria Can Do It… Learning community skills from microbes Andrzej Krauze One of the greatest joys of being a scientist is continuously having the opportunity to see the world in new ways. At a national laboratory or research university, you’re exposed to many different fields of research, from which you can always glean something useful. My current fascination is learning about microbial communities and how they thrive by achi

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Lobster-Pot Science

By | May 1, 2011

By Richard P. Grant Lobster-Pot Science Andrzej Krauze HIDDEN JEWEL Microbiology labs typically contain myriad flasks and stacks of petri dishes crowded with bacteria. That’s fine for someone studying their physiology or genetics. But for researchers wanting to gain insight into bacterial behavior, that laboratory setup is far from optimal. The problem is that homogeneous environments, such as petri dishes, are quite different from the n

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Making the Gradient

By | May 1, 2011

By Karen Hopkin Making the Gradient Ron Kaback didn’t believe that electrochemical gradients could power the transport of sugars and amino acids across cell membranes—until he proved that they do. H. RONALD KABACK Professor of Physiology University of California, Los Angeles F1000 Faculty Member: Neuronal Signaling Mechanisms Photo © 2011 Jim Cornfield Ron Kaback got hooked on membrane transport as a medical student at the Albert Einstei

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Micro Farmers

By | May 1, 2011

By Cristina Luiggi Micro Farmers Dustin Rubenstein discusses how the discovery of amoebas that farm their own food links the development of agriculture with the evolution of social behavior. Although agriculture is often touted as a pivotal human invention, it is not unique to us. It turns out that even slime molds with a penchant for sociality can farm. For Dustin Rubenstein, an evolutionary ecologist at Columbia University, this unexpected finding points to an e

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New Blood for Gene Therapy

By | May 1, 2011

By Megan Scudellari New Blood for Gene Therapy Klein working with five-year old Felix Ott, who was diagnosed with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome at age three. When he was four, Felix received stem-cell gene therapy, and the now seven-year-old has since been able to live a normal life. Verena Müller The two 3-year-olds were very, very sick. One was bleeding internally, suffered from severe eczema and anemia, and had multiple infections in his lungs and colon. The

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One Hip Dino

By | May 1, 2011

By Jef Akst One Hip Dino An artist’s rendition of Brontomerus mcintoshi delivering a powerful kick to a Utahraptor Francisco Gascó For high school junior Mathew Wedel, an internship at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in 1992 was a pretty sweet gig. He was one of those kids whose dinosaur phase had never worn off, and now he got to help prepare and catalog fossils and identify bones donated to the museum by local farmers. But the youn

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Power Failure

By | May 1, 2011

Power Failure Does mitochondrial dysfunction lie at the heart of common, complex diseases like cancer and autism? Kevin Hand Mitochondria are tiny. A single human cell can contain hundreds to thousands of these potato-shaped organelles, depending on the tissue type. They power the biochemical reactions in our cells through the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). These oft-overlooked furnaces, not studied in earnest until the 19

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Simplifying Teaching

By | May 1, 2011

By Hannah Waters Simplifying Teaching How to make your teaching more efficient, effective, and enjoyable without slighting your lab projects Carrie O’neill © ImageZoo/Corbis When he took his first job at Arizona State University, James Elser had spent nearly a decade in the lab and didn’t really know what to expect when it came to teaching. After instructing a few graduate classes, he was tossed in front of his first large class for nonsci

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Skeleton Keys

By | May 1, 2011

By Lewis Wolpert Skeleton Keys There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical. If you stretch out your arms or legs and compare their length, you will, in most cases, find that they are very similar. Indeed, the external features of our body are reliably symmetrical; a noticeably asymmetrical feature is perceived as an abnormality. Related Articles Down to the bone Of mice and paws Signaling blocker halts bone growth

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