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Survey Methodology

By | May 1, 2011

Survey Methodology Survey Form: A Web-based survey form was posted at www.the-scientist.com from September 8 to November 29, 2010. Results were collected and collated automatically. Invitations: E-mail invitations were sent to readers of The Scientist and registrants on The Scientist web site who identified themselves as working in commercial or industrial companies. Responses: 2,213 useable and qualified responses were received. Responses were rejected if the

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Survey Questions

By | May 1, 2011

Survey Questions Best Places to Work Industry 2011 Category Question Research Environment My company provides adequate funding for my research. Research Environment My company’s research mission is logical and practical, and I understand my role in it. Research Environment Open collaboration with other company scientists helps ensure that I meet the company’s goals. Research Envi

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Wanted: Another Scientific Revolution

By | May 1, 2011

By Laura J. Snyder Wanted: Another Scientific Revolution In the 19th century, four friends changed the way scientists viewed themselves. It’s time for another shake-up. Broadway Books, 2011 When H.M.S. Beagle set sail from Plymouth Sound on December 27, 1831, the ship’s young naturalist, Charles Darwin, was a self-proclaimed “natural philosopher.” By the time he disembarked the ship about five years later, he was a “scientist”

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Wrestling with Recurrent Infections

By | May 1, 2011

By Gayatri Vedantam and Glenn S. Tillotson Wrestling with Recurrent Infections Clostridium difficile is evolving more robust toxicity, repeatedly attacking its victims, and driving the search for alternative therapies to fight the infection. photoillustration by Sean Mccabe; Science Photo Library (boy); Sebastian Kaulitzki/ Istockphoto.com (Intestines); Olena Timashova/Istockphoto.com (Green bacteria); Jiri Flogel/Istockphoto.com (Blue bacteria) As infectiou

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An Aspirin for your Cancer?

By | April 1, 2011

By Giorgio Trinchieri An Aspirin for your Cancer? Can tumors—which can originate from, and often resemble, chronically inflamed tissue—be curtailed using familiar anti-inflammatory agents, without their side effects? Colin Anderson / Gettyimages What if taking aspirin could reduce your risk of cancer? Researchers have debated the relationship between inflammation and cancer for many years, but recent studies have reignited the discussion with eviden

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Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

By | April 1, 2011

By Cristina Luiggi Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687 Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, with the construction of a monastic medical college and the penning of several influential medical texts. Perhaps most striking was a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, which were intended to illustrate a comprehensive four-volume medical treatise called The Blue Beryl. Created between 1687 and 1703, these paintings are vibrant pieces of educational

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2011

By Bob Grant Capsule Reviews The Great Sperm Whale: A Natural History of the Ocean’s Most Magnificent and Mysterious Creature by Richard Ellis University Press of Kansas, April 6, 2011 Related Articles Cleaning Up After Ourselves Like an aesthetic Ahab chasing his quarry through the inky depths, author, marine naturalist, conservationist, and painter Richard Ellis sets out to capture the mighty Physeter macrocephalus by laying bare i

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Cleaning Up After Ourselves

By | April 1, 2011

By Richard B. Alley Cleaning Up After Ourselves In the past, pollution drove the relentless search for new fuel sources. Rising levels of carbon dioxide should do the same. W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2011 We may be human because we figured out how to use more energy than the 100 W that burns within us from the food we eat. Certainly, we hadn’t been human for very long before we learned to benefit from extra outside energy, with some of the wealthier

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2011

Contributors A seasoned hiker and skier who has visited most of the US National Parks, Keith Flaherty is no stranger to unfamiliar terrain. He entered college around the time of the molecular biology revolution in the early 1980s, and the new science entranced him. “It stuck with me as being an intriguing and fascinating level at which to try to understand human biology,” he says. In medical school he started to “think about patients and diseases

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Family Affair

By | April 1, 2011

By Megan Scudellari Family Affair Andrzej Krauze At a 2009 meeting at the University of California, Davis, plant pathologist Pamela Ronald and a group of immunologists were talking about the work that led to the identification of the first mammalian innate immune receptor a decade before. Ronald, who isolated the first immune receptor in plants that recognizes a conserved microbial molecule, had heard the story before. This time, however, the name of the mammal pa

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