Uncategorized

Most Recent

Fountain of Youth?

By | April 1, 2011

By Richard P. Grant Fountain of Youth? Preston Estep discusses the role that telomeres play in the aging process. Courtesy of Preston Estep (Portrait) Telomeres are protective lengths of repetitive DNA at the end of chromosomes that shorten with each cell division. When a single telomere gets down to a critical length, it triggers a damage response that causes the cell to become quiescent. If enough cells in a tissue become quiescent or go into apoptosis, then

2 Comments

Harvesting Ideas

By | April 1, 2011

By Karen Hopkin Harvesting Ideas Joy Ward is reaping the rewards of her studies on how plants handle global climate change—gathering academic accolades and presidential embraces along the way. JOY WARD Associate Professor of Plant Physiological Ecology and Global Change University of Kansas F1000 Faculty Member, Physiological Ecology Jason Dailey As a teen, Joy Ward worked as a tour guide at Indian Caverns, Pennsylvania’s largest limestone

0 Comments

Imagining a Cure

By | April 1, 2011

For cancer patients, close is not good enough.

1 Comment

Kelly Benoit-Bird: Sounding the Deep

By | April 1, 2011

By Carrie Arnold Kelly Benoit-Bird: Sounding the Deep Peter Krupp Associate professor, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University. Age: 34 When her cell phone rang at 7:30 one morning last September, marine scientist Kelly Benoit-Bird eyeballed the caller ID and decided it was a prank or a wrong number. Seven months pregnant and in desperate need of some quality shut-eye, she turned over and went back to sleep. But when the phone

1 Comment

Mail

By | April 1, 2011

Mail Worms As Therapy Re: Bob Grant’s article about worm therapy for autoimmune disease:1 A minireview by Hanada et al., (Biol. Chem, 391:1365-70, 2010) of the RANKL/RANK system involving T-cell membrane protein ligands and ligand targets in various tissues, including specific neural and astroglial terrains in the brain, may provide additional support to the findings that inflammatory responses could play a role in autism. Mel Winestock

0 Comments

Medical Publishing for an N of One

By | April 1, 2011

By George D. Lundberg Medical Publishing for an N of One New technologies and mind-sets are required for information delivery in the age of genomics. U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program, ornl.gov/hgmis Science and medical journals are so 20th century. The Internet changes everything, they say. Well, maybe not everything, yet. The number of articles in medical and scientific periodicals is still fundamentally a product of the number of paper pa

0 Comments

Model Liver

By | April 1, 2011

By Richard P. Grant Model Liver Stefan Hoehme (3D model of damaged liver lobule) The paper S. Hoehme et al., “Prediction and validation of cell alignment along microvessels as order principle to restore tissue architecture in liver regeneration,” PNAS, 107:10371-76, 2010. Free F1000 Evaluation The finding Dirk Drasdo at INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt and colleagues have been trying for a number of years to turn experimental information into mathematic

0 Comments

PET Guerrilla

By | April 1, 2011

By Chris Tachibana PET Guerrilla Former guerrilla leader Henry Engler (left) talks to Uruguayan President José Mujica at the launch of CUDIM in Montevideo last year. IVAN FRANCO / epa / Corbis In August 1972, Uruguayan medical student Henry Engler’s education was interrupted. He was shot in the shoulder, arrested for being a Tupamaro antigovernment urban guerrilla, and imprisoned for 13 years—11 in solitary confinement. Engler says he joined

1 Comment

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2011

Speaking of Science Baris Simsek / Istockphoto.com The achievement is impressive, but it is a wholly formal achievement that involves no knowledge…and it does not come within a million miles of replicating the achievements of everyday human thought. —Law professor Stanley Fish, on Watson, the I.B.M.–built computer that won a game of “Jeopardy” (The New York Times Opinionator blog, Feb. 21, 2011) By 2029, we’ll have reve

2 Comments

Taking Aim at Melanoma

By | April 1, 2011

By Keith T. Flaherty Taking Aim at Melanoma Understanding oncogenesis at the molecular level offers the prospect of tailoring treatments much more precisely for patients with advanced cases of this deadliest of skin cancers. Pep Karsten / fstop / Corbis They’re lawyers and receptionists, philanthropists and film editors. Some are retired, some just starting families. What they have in common is metastatic melanoma, a cancer that will likely claim their

4 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
Anova
Anova

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Life Technologies