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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

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image: The 2015 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2015 Salary Survey Is Here

By | March 13, 2015

Answer some brief questions and help us determine the most current salary data for life scientists.

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image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

2 Comments

image: Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

By | February 23, 2015

Scientists develop synthetic blood-based biomarkers to amplify tumor signals in a mouse model.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

2 Comments

image: Culturing Changes Cells

Culturing Changes Cells

By | February 3, 2015

Within days of their transfer to a dish, a certain epigenetic mark vanishes from mouse cells.

2 Comments

image: Sonic Experiment

Sonic Experiment

By | January 29, 2015

An artist takes advantage of muscle-mimicking polymers to manipulate sounds.

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image: Benefits of Missing MYC

Benefits of Missing MYC

By | January 22, 2015

Mice engineered to have just one copy of the gene Myc live longer, healthier lives than wild-type animals.

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image: GMO “Kill Switches”

GMO “Kill Switches”

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists design bacteria reliant upon synthetic amino acids to contain genetically modified organisms.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  

7 Comments

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